2014 Colour of the year

January 31, 2014

McElherans Pantone home page slide

 

Purple? Pink? Something Else?

You or I may call it a purply, flowery, magenta-y shade of pink but Pantone simply refers to it as their Colour of the Year for 2014.

 

Radiant Orchid  

color watch

Officially, this year’s Colour of the Year is called Radiant Orchid. The name alone sounds healthy and fresh and electrifying and elicits thoughts of natural beauty on sunny spring days. Fashion designers are already incorporating the colour into this year’s styles and cosmetics giant Sephora has embraced it. “It’s a perfect nail color,” says Sephora’s chief merchant, Margarita Arriagata. “We tried the lipstick on every single skin tone. It’s killer.” Even appliances will be impacted by Pantone’s choice. Coffee-machine maker Keurig has announced that starting this February, one of its latest offerings will be drenched in Radiant Orchid.

 

Inside Your Home

So fashion and houseware designers are onboard with this plum crazy shade of purple but what about interior designers? Are they put off by the brash brightness? Not at all. The colour is bold and confident but its overuse could be considered overpowering so your best bet is to use it as a dramatic accent. You’ll want to stop short of dousing a room in pinky-purple and instead think area rugs, accent walls, pillows, and throws.

Radiant Orchid is a powerful colour and Pantone suggests that it will be seductive when paired with reds or other purples and pinks. It also goes well with deep greens which means it’s a perfect complement to 2013’s Colour of the Year, Emerald Green.

Thayer sofas

 

Colour of the Year a Flash in the Pan?

You’d be forgiven for thinking that decorating with Radiant Orchid is a short-term investment. After all, Pantone will announce another exciting, hip, must-have colour this time next year. Why use Radiant Orchid when it’s only here for 12 months? The belief that every element must conform to the same design or colour scheme is an outdated concept and mixing and matching is now an accepted practice. “Our purpose is not to dogmatically inflict a color on everyone,” says Leatrice Eiseman, a color consultant to Pantone. “We’re far beyond the ’70s when the decree was made that mauve was ‘it.”



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